CAN DO – An uncanny canning renaissance

Winona Griggs

CAN DO – An uncanny canning renaissance

I wanted to share something incredible I’ve discovered – a fascinating renaissance happening in the world of canning. It’s amazing what people are doing with cans these days, and I just couldn’t wait to tell you all about it!

Have you ever wondered what happens to those tin cans after we’ve emptied them of their contents? Well, it turns out that they can be transformed into some truly extraordinary works of art. Artists all over the world have been using cans to create unique sculptures and stunning installations.

When I first saw these creations, I was completely blown away. It’s hard to believe that something as ordinary as a can could be turned into something so extraordinary. The level of creativity and skill that goes into these pieces is truly mind-boggling.

One artist, in particular, has taken canning to a whole new level. His name is Tom Steel, and his work is simply awe-inspiring. He takes old tin cans and meticulously cuts and bends them into intricate shapes and patterns. The end result is a stunning piece of art that is both visually striking and thought-provoking.

Another artist, Sarah Tinman, uses cans as the canvas for her paintings. She carefully removes the labels from the cans and then paints intricate designs on them. The way she transforms these ordinary objects into beautiful works of art is truly remarkable.

But it’s not just artists who are getting in on the canning renaissance. Everyday people are finding creative uses for cans as well. From DIY flower pots to homemade lanterns, the possibilities are truly endless.

What I love most about this canning renaissance is that it highlights the importance of recycling and repurposing. Instead of throwing away these cans, we can give them new life and turn them into something beautiful. It’s a win-win for both us and the environment.

So next time you’re about to toss that empty can into the recycling bin, stop and think about the incredible potential it holds. With a little creativity and imagination, you can transform that can into something truly extraordinary. The canning renaissance is upon us – let’s embrace it!

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Who would have thought that the ancient practice of canning would make a comeback in such a trendy way? It seems like everyone, from trendy restaurants to fashionable individuals, is getting in on this seasonally sustainable culinary art. It’s fascinating how this old-fashioned method of preserving food has found its way back into the spotlight.

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

When it comes to my Oupa Toy, he’s a master at bottling the most delicious green figs. While Ouma takes care of the cooking and creating the recipes, it’s Oupa who braves the sticky sap of the fig tree every year in late October. He’s the one who picks the figs, and he’s also the meticulous sous chef who meticulously sands the skin of each fig and makes a small cross at the bottom with a sharp knife. He’ll explain that this allows the syrup to soak into every part of the fig.

Imagine the scene: I sit in awe as I watch my grandfather, Oupa Toy, settle into his La-Z-Boy chair, ready to enjoy a rugby match. The sight is complete with a massive pile of figs on one side and a bowl of water infused with blouvitterjoel on the other. The figs are carefully prepared and soaked in this concoction to preserve their vibrant green color when they are bottled. Oupa has many tales about the mysterious blue vitriol, also known as copper sulphate. According to him, it was given to young soldiers to suppress certain natural urges. I’m not sure if this is true, but it certainly does wonders for the figs. Oupa insists that green figs must be harvested by October 17th; any later would be a catastrophe. After that date, the fruits become hollow inside, posing a high risk of fermentation once they are bottled.

READ  Choosing the Best University for PGCE in South Africa: A Comprehensive Guide

Catastrophes are a big problem for people who like to preserve food. It used to be even worse because if the food wasn’t preserved correctly, it could mean life or death. If my family had to rely on preserving food, we would have all been dead a long time ago. Thankfully, we’ve found other ways to get by, mainly by learning from our grandparents.

But not everyone in the family has had the same luck. One of my aunts, for example, refuses to make jam because it always turns out terrible. It ends up being a sticky, dark mess that looks like hot tar. And even if the jam cooks properly, it changes color and texture as soon as it’s bottled. My grandpa calls it “tire jam.”

I have another aunt who has the same talent, but she had to practice to develop it. My mom and Tannie Celest once had a mishap when they were trying to bottle some halved peaches. They were bottling them on a 1970s linoleum kitchen table, and the legs of the table couldn’t handle the pressure of them screwing on the lid. But they were determined to succeed. While Tannie Celest pressed down on the jar, my mom grabbed hold of the table and lifted it up so that the peaches could be securely bottled. A disaster was avoided, and they both erupted into uncontrollable laughter. My mom likes to jokingly say that they “canned themselves.” It’s definitely a funny memory.

Back in the 1790s, this fancy thing called canning came into existence. Let me tell you the story. There was this French confectioner named Nicolas Appert, and he noticed something interesting. When he sealed food in glass bottles and added some heat, it didn’t spoil. Pretty cool, right? It worked with all sorts of food: meat, veggies, fruit, even milk. So, the French Navy decided to give it a try and see if it would work for their sailors. Guess what? It did! They could enjoy canned food on their long voyages. But here’s the thing: Nicolas Appert didn’t have all the details right. His theories were a bit off. Nonetheless, the sailors were lucky because the food held up just fine.

In 1862, Louis Pasteur made a groundbreaking discovery about micro-organisms, food spoilage, and illness. He gave a name to this process: Pasteurization. It’s like canning on steroids. You see, it’s not just about the absence of oxygen. It’s about how micro-organisms react to oxygen and cause food to spoil.

I know, it sounds a bit complicated. But here’s the bottom line: if you want your figs to stay fresh, make sure to pick them before October 17th every year. And don’t forget to listen to your grandpa’s advice – he knows best! But if you need a little extra help, you can always turn to the experts in food preservation.

The Power of Peaches

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Let me tell you a story about Isabel’s Canned Peaches.

It’s a tale of determination and resilience, as Sonnie and Isabel Basson faced many challenges when they lost their farm. But Isabel didn’t let that defeat her.

Like many farmers’ wives in tough times, Isabel used the resources available to her to create additional income. And thus, her fruit preserving business was born.

For the past 10 years, Isabel has been tirelessly working to build her business. Now, her beautiful and nostalgic fruit preserves can be found in shops all over South Africa.

The halved Karoo peaches are Isabel’s pride and joy, and they continue to be a customer favorite.

If you’d like to get in touch with Isabel, you can contact her at 083 230 3199.

WHERE: All of our produce comes from Rietvlei Farm, located outside of Laingsburg in the beautiful Western Cape. You can easily find Isabel products at various farm stalls across South Africa, including the popular Ou Meul Bakkery franchise.

Canned beef:

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Hey there, let me tell you about a unique dish that you simply can’t miss! It’s called canned beef tartare, and it’s served at the amazing Muse Restaurant in Gqeberha.

Now, hold on a second, don’t let the word “canned” throw you off. We’re definitely not talking about your average bully beef here. Muse Restaurant has taken beef tartare to a whole new level by serving it in a can, and let me tell you, it’s absolutely mind-blowing. Trust me, this may just be the best canned beef you’ll ever taste.

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Here’s the interesting part: the dish is actually made fresh right there in the restaurant. But the chef, Allan Bezuidenhout, adds a fun twist by serving it in a sealed can. How cool is that? It’s like opening up a surprise package filled with deliciousness.

Now, let’s talk about what goes into this incredible dish. The canned beef tartare is made with the finest South African beef fillet, which is seasoned to perfection. And that’s not all! It’s also served with a poached egg yolk that adds a creamy richness, crispy onions for a delightful crunch, and charcoal tapioca crisps that bring a unique smoky flavor to the mix. Trust me, every bite is a burst of flavors that will leave you wanting more.

If you’re already tempted, here’s how you can get in touch with Muse Restaurant: just give them a call at 041 582 1937. And if you’re wondering where you can find this hidden gem, it’s located at 1B Stanley Street, Richmond Hill, Gqeberha, Eastern Cape.

Prepare for a wickedly good experience

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Welcome to Wickedfood Earth Farm!

At Wickedfood Earth Country Cooking School, you can join one of our exciting preserving workshops and learn how to preserve your own fruits. Located in the enchanting Magaliesberg Mountains, you even have the option to stay on the farm while attending the workshop. Our farm boasts a wonderful food garden and orchard with over 50 different varieties of fruit and nut trees, as well as berries. You’ll have the opportunity to harvest your own bounty from our garden before heading into the kitchen to master the art of preservation.

During the workshop, you will learn how to make a selection of six preserves, including jams, chutneys, relishes, sauces, vinegar, and bottled fruit. Plus, you’ll have the chance to take some of your creations home with you!

It’s worth noting that our Wickedfood Earth Farm food garden has received international recognition from Slow Food as an important educational garden.

Contact us at: 076 236 2345

WHERE to find us: Wickedfood Earth Farm, Hekpoort, Magaliesberg, North West

Pickled Tequila

There’s something fascinating about the combination of pickles and tequila. The tangy, briny flavor of the pickles complements the bold, smooth taste of the tequila, creating a unique and tantalizing sensory experience. It’s a surprising pairing that seems unconventional at first glance, but once you try it, you’ll understand the allure.

Picture this: you’re at a party, sipping on a glass of tequila, when you notice a jar of pickles on the table. Curiosity piques your interest, and you decide to take a bite of a pickle before taking another sip of your drink. Instantly, your taste buds explode with delight as the flavors mingle and dance on your tongue. The crispness of the pickle contrasts with the warmth of the tequila, creating a harmonious blend that is both refreshing and invigorating.

But why does this combination work so well? It all comes down to the balance of flavors. The tanginess of the pickles cuts through the richness of the tequila, preventing it from overwhelming your palate. The brininess adds a subtle saltiness that enhances the natural sweetness of the agave. It’s like a delicate dance between two contrasting flavors, each bringing out the best in the other.

Not only does pickled tequila tantalize your taste buds, but it also elevates the overall drinking experience. It adds a layer of complexity and intrigue, making each sip a journey of discovery. It’s a conversation starter, a way to surprise and delight your friends at your next gathering. And with so many different types of pickles available – dill, sweet, spicy – the flavor combinations are endless.

So, the next time you find yourself reaching for a glass of tequila, don’t forget to grab a jar of pickles as well. Give pickled tequila a try and prepare to be amazed. You might just discover your new favorite flavor combination.

READ  5 great accommodation options for the Cape Getaway Show MzansiBride

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Have you ever tried agave bud pickles? They’re not just any ordinary pickles; they’re made from the buds of agave plants grown by Tim Murray, a farmer in Graaff Reinet, South Africa. Tim is an expert in all things agave and loves finding delicious ways to use this versatile plant.

We started experimenting with the agave buds because we had so many of them,” Tim explains. “And let me tell you, they’re incredible when cooked. They can be fried in butter, just like asparagus, or battered and deep-fried to create what we like to call karoo prawns! Unfortunately, the fresh buds don’t last very long, so my mom and I came up with a secret recipe to preserve them.”

The result? Tangy, crunchy agave bud pickles that are a perfect addition to any snack platter. Tim and his wife, Lisa, take pride in picking, pickling, and preserving each batch themselves right in their farm kitchen.

If you’re curious about these unique pickles or want to place an order, you can contact Tim Murray at 082 632 3103. Trust me, once you give them a try, you’ll be hooked!

WHERE: You can find the Murray’s Roode Bloem Farm outside Graaff-Reinet. If you’re interested in the agave pickles, you can get them at select farm stalls across South Africa. Just contact Tim to get your hands on some.

Discover the Tlink Tlink

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Canned wine is the new cool.

People in South Africa have been drinking umqombothi from 5L cans for a while now. They’ve been doing it even before Lion Lager became a thing. And now, the wine industry is jumping on the trend too. Brands like JC Le Roux and Spier are offering sparkling wine six-packs and tall tins of tasty rosé. It’s perfect for those mountain-top picnics. Let’s face it, carrying a good bottle of wine up a mountain is no easy task. And who wants to drink warm wine? I know I don’t.

The cute little tins of wine are not just for picnics though. You can use them for any occasion. They add a playful touch to any gathering. I mean, if it works for food, why not wine? Sorry, old Nic from France, but canned wine is where it’s at.

WHERE: You can buy canned wine online or at liquor stores across South Africa.

The original hipsters

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Let me tell you about Mr Kanso, an unusual restaurant in Japan that specializes in serving tinned food. It may seem strange, but preserved foods are becoming more popular around the world, just like they have always been in South Africa.

When you step into Mr Kanso, you’ll find over 300 different types of canned food from all over the globe. Of course, they have classics like sardines and tuna, but they also offer more unique options. How about trying smoked liver, Spanish pork, Japanese curry, takoyaki, or even egg cakes? Mr Kanso also has a special feature where they pair canned food with alcohol, giving you a unique dining experience. And believe it or not, tins have now become trendy items that foodies collect while traveling.

Mr Kanso isn’t the only place embracing the tinned food trend. New York has a popular spot on Maiden Lane that serves the finest tinned seafood, fresh pastries, and craft tinned liquor. The locals there believe that a tin of fish, paired with a salad or a piece of baguette, can make for a satisfying and complete meal. It’s amazing how something so simple can be so delicious!

Wow, can you believe it? Here we are, feeling all shy and awkward about our inexpensive meals while the South Africans are the ones who really know how to be cool.

Yep, South Africans are the original hipsters, no doubt about it.

Okay, let’s get down to business. Here are some awesome spots that you need to check out:

Mr Kanso: 1 Chome-5-26 Minamihorie, Nishi Ward, Osaka, Japan

Maiden Lane: 162 Avenue B, New York, New York, USA

Oh, and don’t forget to read these cool stories too:

Leave a Comment

CAN DO – An uncanny canning renaissance

I wanted to share something incredible I’ve discovered – a fascinating renaissance happening in the world of canning. It’s amazing what people are doing with cans these days, and I just couldn’t wait to tell you all about it!

Have you ever wondered what happens to those tin cans after we’ve emptied them of their contents? Well, it turns out that they can be transformed into some truly extraordinary works of art. Artists all over the world have been using cans to create unique sculptures and stunning installations.

When I first saw these creations, I was completely blown away. It’s hard to believe that something as ordinary as a can could be turned into something so extraordinary. The level of creativity and skill that goes into these pieces is truly mind-boggling.

One artist, in particular, has taken canning to a whole new level. His name is Tom Steel, and his work is simply awe-inspiring. He takes old tin cans and meticulously cuts and bends them into intricate shapes and patterns. The end result is a stunning piece of art that is both visually striking and thought-provoking.

Another artist, Sarah Tinman, uses cans as the canvas for her paintings. She carefully removes the labels from the cans and then paints intricate designs on them. The way she transforms these ordinary objects into beautiful works of art is truly remarkable.

But it’s not just artists who are getting in on the canning renaissance. Everyday people are finding creative uses for cans as well. From DIY flower pots to homemade lanterns, the possibilities are truly endless.

What I love most about this canning renaissance is that it highlights the importance of recycling and repurposing. Instead of throwing away these cans, we can give them new life and turn them into something beautiful. It’s a win-win for both us and the environment.

So next time you’re about to toss that empty can into the recycling bin, stop and think about the incredible potential it holds. With a little creativity and imagination, you can transform that can into something truly extraordinary. The canning renaissance is upon us – let’s embrace it!

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Who would have thought that the ancient practice of canning would make a comeback in such a trendy way? It seems like everyone, from trendy restaurants to fashionable individuals, is getting in on this seasonally sustainable culinary art. It’s fascinating how this old-fashioned method of preserving food has found its way back into the spotlight.

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

When it comes to my Oupa Toy, he’s a master at bottling the most delicious green figs. While Ouma takes care of the cooking and creating the recipes, it’s Oupa who braves the sticky sap of the fig tree every year in late October. He’s the one who picks the figs, and he’s also the meticulous sous chef who meticulously sands the skin of each fig and makes a small cross at the bottom with a sharp knife. He’ll explain that this allows the syrup to soak into every part of the fig.

Imagine the scene: I sit in awe as I watch my grandfather, Oupa Toy, settle into his La-Z-Boy chair, ready to enjoy a rugby match. The sight is complete with a massive pile of figs on one side and a bowl of water infused with blouvitterjoel on the other. The figs are carefully prepared and soaked in this concoction to preserve their vibrant green color when they are bottled. Oupa has many tales about the mysterious blue vitriol, also known as copper sulphate. According to him, it was given to young soldiers to suppress certain natural urges. I’m not sure if this is true, but it certainly does wonders for the figs. Oupa insists that green figs must be harvested by October 17th; any later would be a catastrophe. After that date, the fruits become hollow inside, posing a high risk of fermentation once they are bottled.

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Catastrophes are a big problem for people who like to preserve food. It used to be even worse because if the food wasn’t preserved correctly, it could mean life or death. If my family had to rely on preserving food, we would have all been dead a long time ago. Thankfully, we’ve found other ways to get by, mainly by learning from our grandparents.

But not everyone in the family has had the same luck. One of my aunts, for example, refuses to make jam because it always turns out terrible. It ends up being a sticky, dark mess that looks like hot tar. And even if the jam cooks properly, it changes color and texture as soon as it’s bottled. My grandpa calls it “tire jam.”

I have another aunt who has the same talent, but she had to practice to develop it. My mom and Tannie Celest once had a mishap when they were trying to bottle some halved peaches. They were bottling them on a 1970s linoleum kitchen table, and the legs of the table couldn’t handle the pressure of them screwing on the lid. But they were determined to succeed. While Tannie Celest pressed down on the jar, my mom grabbed hold of the table and lifted it up so that the peaches could be securely bottled. A disaster was avoided, and they both erupted into uncontrollable laughter. My mom likes to jokingly say that they “canned themselves.” It’s definitely a funny memory.

Back in the 1790s, this fancy thing called canning came into existence. Let me tell you the story. There was this French confectioner named Nicolas Appert, and he noticed something interesting. When he sealed food in glass bottles and added some heat, it didn’t spoil. Pretty cool, right? It worked with all sorts of food: meat, veggies, fruit, even milk. So, the French Navy decided to give it a try and see if it would work for their sailors. Guess what? It did! They could enjoy canned food on their long voyages. But here’s the thing: Nicolas Appert didn’t have all the details right. His theories were a bit off. Nonetheless, the sailors were lucky because the food held up just fine.

In 1862, Louis Pasteur made a groundbreaking discovery about micro-organisms, food spoilage, and illness. He gave a name to this process: Pasteurization. It’s like canning on steroids. You see, it’s not just about the absence of oxygen. It’s about how micro-organisms react to oxygen and cause food to spoil.

I know, it sounds a bit complicated. But here’s the bottom line: if you want your figs to stay fresh, make sure to pick them before October 17th every year. And don’t forget to listen to your grandpa’s advice – he knows best! But if you need a little extra help, you can always turn to the experts in food preservation.

The Power of Peaches

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Let me tell you a story about Isabel’s Canned Peaches.

It’s a tale of determination and resilience, as Sonnie and Isabel Basson faced many challenges when they lost their farm. But Isabel didn’t let that defeat her.

Like many farmers’ wives in tough times, Isabel used the resources available to her to create additional income. And thus, her fruit preserving business was born.

For the past 10 years, Isabel has been tirelessly working to build her business. Now, her beautiful and nostalgic fruit preserves can be found in shops all over South Africa.

The halved Karoo peaches are Isabel’s pride and joy, and they continue to be a customer favorite.

If you’d like to get in touch with Isabel, you can contact her at 083 230 3199.

WHERE: All of our produce comes from Rietvlei Farm, located outside of Laingsburg in the beautiful Western Cape. You can easily find Isabel products at various farm stalls across South Africa, including the popular Ou Meul Bakkery franchise.

Canned beef:

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Hey there, let me tell you about a unique dish that you simply can’t miss! It’s called canned beef tartare, and it’s served at the amazing Muse Restaurant in Gqeberha.

Now, hold on a second, don’t let the word “canned” throw you off. We’re definitely not talking about your average bully beef here. Muse Restaurant has taken beef tartare to a whole new level by serving it in a can, and let me tell you, it’s absolutely mind-blowing. Trust me, this may just be the best canned beef you’ll ever taste.

READ  5 great accommodation options for the Cape Getaway Show MzansiBride

Here’s the interesting part: the dish is actually made fresh right there in the restaurant. But the chef, Allan Bezuidenhout, adds a fun twist by serving it in a sealed can. How cool is that? It’s like opening up a surprise package filled with deliciousness.

Now, let’s talk about what goes into this incredible dish. The canned beef tartare is made with the finest South African beef fillet, which is seasoned to perfection. And that’s not all! It’s also served with a poached egg yolk that adds a creamy richness, crispy onions for a delightful crunch, and charcoal tapioca crisps that bring a unique smoky flavor to the mix. Trust me, every bite is a burst of flavors that will leave you wanting more.

If you’re already tempted, here’s how you can get in touch with Muse Restaurant: just give them a call at 041 582 1937. And if you’re wondering where you can find this hidden gem, it’s located at 1B Stanley Street, Richmond Hill, Gqeberha, Eastern Cape.

Prepare for a wickedly good experience

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Welcome to Wickedfood Earth Farm!

At Wickedfood Earth Country Cooking School, you can join one of our exciting preserving workshops and learn how to preserve your own fruits. Located in the enchanting Magaliesberg Mountains, you even have the option to stay on the farm while attending the workshop. Our farm boasts a wonderful food garden and orchard with over 50 different varieties of fruit and nut trees, as well as berries. You’ll have the opportunity to harvest your own bounty from our garden before heading into the kitchen to master the art of preservation.

During the workshop, you will learn how to make a selection of six preserves, including jams, chutneys, relishes, sauces, vinegar, and bottled fruit. Plus, you’ll have the chance to take some of your creations home with you!

It’s worth noting that our Wickedfood Earth Farm food garden has received international recognition from Slow Food as an important educational garden.

Contact us at: 076 236 2345

WHERE to find us: Wickedfood Earth Farm, Hekpoort, Magaliesberg, North West

Pickled Tequila

There’s something fascinating about the combination of pickles and tequila. The tangy, briny flavor of the pickles complements the bold, smooth taste of the tequila, creating a unique and tantalizing sensory experience. It’s a surprising pairing that seems unconventional at first glance, but once you try it, you’ll understand the allure.

Picture this: you’re at a party, sipping on a glass of tequila, when you notice a jar of pickles on the table. Curiosity piques your interest, and you decide to take a bite of a pickle before taking another sip of your drink. Instantly, your taste buds explode with delight as the flavors mingle and dance on your tongue. The crispness of the pickle contrasts with the warmth of the tequila, creating a harmonious blend that is both refreshing and invigorating.

But why does this combination work so well? It all comes down to the balance of flavors. The tanginess of the pickles cuts through the richness of the tequila, preventing it from overwhelming your palate. The brininess adds a subtle saltiness that enhances the natural sweetness of the agave. It’s like a delicate dance between two contrasting flavors, each bringing out the best in the other.

Not only does pickled tequila tantalize your taste buds, but it also elevates the overall drinking experience. It adds a layer of complexity and intrigue, making each sip a journey of discovery. It’s a conversation starter, a way to surprise and delight your friends at your next gathering. And with so many different types of pickles available – dill, sweet, spicy – the flavor combinations are endless.

So, the next time you find yourself reaching for a glass of tequila, don’t forget to grab a jar of pickles as well. Give pickled tequila a try and prepare to be amazed. You might just discover your new favorite flavor combination.

READ  10 things to do in Kimberley MzansiBride

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Have you ever tried agave bud pickles? They’re not just any ordinary pickles; they’re made from the buds of agave plants grown by Tim Murray, a farmer in Graaff Reinet, South Africa. Tim is an expert in all things agave and loves finding delicious ways to use this versatile plant.

We started experimenting with the agave buds because we had so many of them,” Tim explains. “And let me tell you, they’re incredible when cooked. They can be fried in butter, just like asparagus, or battered and deep-fried to create what we like to call karoo prawns! Unfortunately, the fresh buds don’t last very long, so my mom and I came up with a secret recipe to preserve them.”

The result? Tangy, crunchy agave bud pickles that are a perfect addition to any snack platter. Tim and his wife, Lisa, take pride in picking, pickling, and preserving each batch themselves right in their farm kitchen.

If you’re curious about these unique pickles or want to place an order, you can contact Tim Murray at 082 632 3103. Trust me, once you give them a try, you’ll be hooked!

WHERE: You can find the Murray’s Roode Bloem Farm outside Graaff-Reinet. If you’re interested in the agave pickles, you can get them at select farm stalls across South Africa. Just contact Tim to get your hands on some.

Discover the Tlink Tlink

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Canned wine is the new cool.

People in South Africa have been drinking umqombothi from 5L cans for a while now. They’ve been doing it even before Lion Lager became a thing. And now, the wine industry is jumping on the trend too. Brands like JC Le Roux and Spier are offering sparkling wine six-packs and tall tins of tasty rosé. It’s perfect for those mountain-top picnics. Let’s face it, carrying a good bottle of wine up a mountain is no easy task. And who wants to drink warm wine? I know I don’t.

The cute little tins of wine are not just for picnics though. You can use them for any occasion. They add a playful touch to any gathering. I mean, if it works for food, why not wine? Sorry, old Nic from France, but canned wine is where it’s at.

WHERE: You can buy canned wine online or at liquor stores across South Africa.

The original hipsters

CAN DO - An uncanny canning renaissance

Let me tell you about Mr Kanso, an unusual restaurant in Japan that specializes in serving tinned food. It may seem strange, but preserved foods are becoming more popular around the world, just like they have always been in South Africa.

When you step into Mr Kanso, you’ll find over 300 different types of canned food from all over the globe. Of course, they have classics like sardines and tuna, but they also offer more unique options. How about trying smoked liver, Spanish pork, Japanese curry, takoyaki, or even egg cakes? Mr Kanso also has a special feature where they pair canned food with alcohol, giving you a unique dining experience. And believe it or not, tins have now become trendy items that foodies collect while traveling.

Mr Kanso isn’t the only place embracing the tinned food trend. New York has a popular spot on Maiden Lane that serves the finest tinned seafood, fresh pastries, and craft tinned liquor. The locals there believe that a tin of fish, paired with a salad or a piece of baguette, can make for a satisfying and complete meal. It’s amazing how something so simple can be so delicious!

Wow, can you believe it? Here we are, feeling all shy and awkward about our inexpensive meals while the South Africans are the ones who really know how to be cool.

Yep, South Africans are the original hipsters, no doubt about it.

Okay, let’s get down to business. Here are some awesome spots that you need to check out:

Mr Kanso: 1 Chome-5-26 Minamihorie, Nishi Ward, Osaka, Japan

Maiden Lane: 162 Avenue B, New York, New York, USA

Oh, and don’t forget to read these cool stories too:

Leave a Comment